Book

Who Killed Jesus?

How Hierarchy, Atonement Theology, and the Just War Tradition

are Stumbling Blocks to Christ

Cover of "Who Killed Jesus?" bookGiven the Gospel fact that Jesus wasn’t a priest, why does Christianity have a priesthood and how did these hierarchs come to control the institutional Church?

Given the Gospel fact that Jesus’ response to sinners was to spend most of his time with them and love them, why do some Christians believe the exact opposite about God – that God is estranged from sinners, angry with them, and demands an atoning payment for their sin?

Given the Gospel fact that Jesus acted as a creative healing power, especially in conflict, why do some Christians promote an ethic of violence, specifically a just war tradition as a response to conflict?

How did a ruling priestly class, an atonement theology based on suffering, and a tradition justifying warfare come to characterize the faith community of Jesus who was a commoner, a loving presence, and a healing power?

Who Killed Jesus?

How Hierarchy, Atonement Theology, and the Just War Tradition

are Stumbling Blocks to Christ

By reading Who Killed Jesus?, you’ll discover hierarchy, atonement theology, and the just war tradition are obstacles to Jesus. They prevent us from knowing Jesus and following his way. Following Jesus’ way means we convert from hierarchy and relate as he did – in communion; it means we convert from atonement theology’s deity who inflicts suffering and alleviate it like Jesus did – lovingly; it means we convert from an ethic of violence and practice Jesus’ ethic – creative healing power. Jesus’ way of communion, love, and creative healing power guides Peace Farm.

All proceeds from the book fund Peace Farm